When to Use Hard Medium and Low Firing Enamels

A question came up today about hard, medium, and low firing enamels.

Hard firing enamels are fired at a higher temperature as in the 1500’s degree range or longer in the kiln.

Medium firing enamels I think of using in 1400’s degree range, or at higher temp as 1500 degrees, but less time.

Low firing enamels maybe fired in the 1300’s or even in the 1400’s with less time.

 

The purpose of all this is two things expansion of the metal being used and your technique being used.

Start with copper as it is used most commonly in enamels.

Copper oxidizes the fastest of the metals we use in enameling. We balance this by using medium firing enamels so they melt or fuse before the copper has time to oxide. If it oxides the enamel is likely to flake off or just discolor.

Many enameling on copper use the oxidation to get some beautiful colors.

You can fire at a higher temperature so it fuses quickly not allowing the copper to oxidize. Another way to balance this is to use finer grit of enamel. The finer grit will fuse quicker than a larger grit of enamel without allowing oxygen to get to the copper. This allows the enamellist to achieve that beautiful gold or stunning golden orange copper color.

It is best to know the fusing points of all your enamels so you know which ones to apply as a base or flux. Your base coat of enamel or known as flux, should be the hardest enamel you are applying to your base metal so you do not have these problems.

1)My-Heart

 

Above the flux was a lower firing enamel than the top coats. So as the top layers melted the flux rose up and the top layer of enamel sank down.

 

2) Same here,

Tresa

 

 

The flux coat of enamel was not hard enough to prevent the following layers of enamel  from touching the sliver. And the brownish color of enamel is just burnt.

In cloisonné we never want our warm colors to touch the silver. It causes burning. Silver is going to hold heat longer than copper so we use a hard firing base. And in some incidences we will use several layers of the hard firing flux before layering in our warm colors to be very sure the red never touches the silver base.

 

A comment to address

“I’m torch-firing, I always have my work in my sight so I just watch for signs of melting, which happens very fast.  I’ve had “pull through” with Titanium White.  Titanium White really reacts nicely with copper and you can get some really lovely, but unpredictable, effects.  With a little overfiring the enamel turns a beautiful rust color and in spots will be green.”

Yes these effects can be used to your advantage, this is the oxidation of the copper coming through. And in torch firing I realize you are not going by temperature and have the advantage of seeing all that is happening.

 

Enameling on copper, as in painting enamel  in this piece,

Flesh-Colors-004Flesh-Colors-010IMG_0140

It is necessary to use a hard firing flux as it will be fired many times and I do not want the painting to disappear into the base coat of flux. Also in repeated firings the copper can still oxidize through the enamel and show a color change after many firings.  As I paint in my image I need the painting enamel to adhere to the base coat of flux by firing the piece, then I can continue layering my painting with enamel colors (soft firing enamel)that fire at a lower temperature or less time. The domed metal add strength or less expansion. So it can handle a harder firing enamel without so much expansion or movement in the enamel. If the base coat was a lower firing temperature it would become soft enough in firing the image would distort as the enamel base or flux would move before the image enamels fuse. Painting enamels are a soft or low firing enamel= as they are ground to a face powder grit.

 

A color plate is a very good answer to help you know which is which when you are not sure.

The enamel dot fourth from the left is still grainy after all the rest are fused.

Color-Plate

This color plate shows the top row, second from the right, as becoming liquid so much faster than all the other enamels it is completely flat.

Flesh-Colors-003Flesh-Colors-003IMG_0132

 

If you have three enamel on a plate, one hard firing, one medium firing, one low firing and fire the plate once you will see they melt at different speeds.

If you want to use them all in one project just remember the hard is on the bottom then the medium and then the soft or low firing enamel. This is also why you can use unleaded with leaded enamels as long as you put the unleaded on the bottom as it is a high fire enamel.

Happy Enameling!

 

2 thoughts on “When to Use Hard Medium and Low Firing Enamels

  1. Kevin Goreli

    Hi,
    Thank you for your article. Would you please tell me what kind of red enamels (maker/brand) are those on your “color-plate.”

    Thank you!
    Kevin

    Reply
    1. Patsy Croft Post author

      Kevin,

      If you are referring to plate number 8 they are Ninomiya’s and Bovano’s leaded enamels. These are the only enamels I use. These are more pink than red.

      Thanks for visiting, Patsy

      Reply

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